Taranis: Celtic Thunder by Sheena McGrath

It seems strange, if you look at Irish or Welsh mythology, that there doesn’t seem to be any thunder-god like Thor. However, among the Celtic peoples of continental Europe, we find the god Taranis, whose name means “thunder” and who sometimes wields a thunderbolt.1 Three altars dedicated to him come from France (Thauron, Orgon and Tours),…

Devotional Poetry

Devotional poetry is defined by the Oxford Reference Library as ‘poetry expressing religious worship or prayer’. Whereas the mainstream religions possess many centuries of continuous material, within Brythonic polytheism we have no ancient devotional poetry. This is because the Druids and Bards who maintained the religious traditions of Britain and their predecessors did not write…

Notions of Devotion by Potia

Dictionary definitions of “Devotion” will say things like: “strong attachment (to) or affection (for a cause, person, etc) marked by dedicated loyalty” “religious zeal; piety” “religious observance or prayers” “profound dedication; consecration.” (All from dictionary.com) According to the source information on dictionary.com the origins of the word go back to the ancient Latin giving meanings…

Devotion to Belisama

Riga Belisama Most Shining Queen Most Mighty Queen know you are honoured when the sun shines on the water bringing river-light to our sacred valleys You can read more about Belisama, goddess of the river Ribble in Lancashire, HERE

The Giants With Us

‘Brutus! There lies beyond the Gallic bounds An island which the Western sea surrounds, By giants once possessed, now few remain To bar thy entrance or obstruct thy reign’ Geoffrey of Monmouth Giants appear in many world myths. In Indo-European mythology we find a common theme: they are primordial beings who are killed or restrained,…

Rhiannon’s Child by Robin Herne

From Robin Herne: ‘The story below is the tale of Rhiannon’s child. She is described as a magical queen in the Mabinogion, but some historians and many pagans believe that she is the euhemerised form of an ancient British horse deity, Rigantona. She certainly has a presence in ritual.’ This story was first published on…

Shrewsbury Meetup

On Saturday 22nd April we held our annual Brython meetup. Members present were Greg, Lee, and myself. We chose Shrewsbury because of its location on a trainline in the midlands for accessibility, because it is on the Severn, and because Gerald of Wales claims that Shrewsbury was the centre of the Brythonic kingdom of Pengwern….

Cernunnos and Flidais by Sheena McGrath

Flidais is still less well known than she should be, but Cernunnos, thanks in part to Wiccan theology, is a very famous god. It’s tempting to put them together as a Wiccan-style divine couple, but Flidais is Irish, while Cernunnos is a Gaulish god who is best known from art found in Paris and Rheims,…

Spring Equinox – A Fragile Balance

There is surprisingly little written about how the Spring Equinox was celebrated in Brythonic tradition. However, we can presume earlier inhabitants of Britain were aware of the equal length of day and night, blackthorn blossom, celandine sparkling beside streams and frogspawn pooling in ponds. They would also have noticed birds nesting and the return of…

‘What Blodeuwedd Never Said To Lleu’ by Megli

My skull which you cradle is a mossy nest of woven wood and feather-tangles. Behind my eyes storms a hive, bee-heat and bee-murmur – Do you feel it when you stroke your man’s thumbs on my eyelids? Bend for the silk of my kiss? Do you hear her, the queen in the cells of my…

Brythonic Polytheism in the Lancashire Landscape

An inspirited landscape. A landscape alive with spirits. Many cultures inhabit, and have inhabited, my locality of Penwortham, Lancashire, in North West England, and given names to its landmarks and deities. Whilst the predominant culture is English, there are strong traces of an earlier Brythonic culture and the Brythonic deities are still here. Brythonic Culture…

Cares y Bwlch

They say I ate the flesh of men, cursed me although they eat the flesh of my land. Although they grind its bones to make their bread, they denied and cursed my millstones. They were so terrified of disappearing into the gap of my mouth they stopped riding through the pass and called for a…